REMOVING VENEER FROM FURNITURE. REMOVING VENEER


Removing veneer from furniture. Baby furniture table. Western kitchen furniture.



Removing Veneer From Furniture





removing veneer from furniture






    furniture
  • Large movable equipment, such as tables and chairs, used to make a house, office, or other space suitable for living or working

  • A person's habitual attitude, outlook, and way of thinking

  • Small accessories or fittings for a particular use or piece of equipment

  • furnishings that make a room or other area ready for occupancy; "they had too much furniture for the small apartment"; "there was only one piece of furniture in the room"

  • Furniture is the mass noun for the movable objects ('mobile' in Latin languages) intended to support various human activities such as seating and sleeping in beds, to hold objects at a convenient height for work using horizontal surfaces above the ground, or to store things.

  • Furniture + 2 is the most recent EP released by American post-hardcore band Fugazi. It was recorded in January and February 2001, the same time that the band was recording their last album, The Argument, and released in October 2001 on 7" and on CD.





    removing
  • Change one's home or place of residence by moving to (another place)

  • Take (something) away or off from the position occupied

  • (removal) the act of removing; "he had surgery for the removal of a malignancy"

  • (removal) dismissal from office

  • Take off (clothing)

  • remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract; "remove a threat"; "remove a wrapper"; "Remove the dirty dishes from the table"; "take the gun from your pocket"; "This machine withdraws heat from the environment"





    veneer
  • coating consisting of a thin layer of superior wood glued to a base of inferior wood

  • Cover (something) with a decorative layer of fine wood

  • Cover or disguise (someone or something's true nature) with an attractive appearance

  • cover with veneer; "veneer the furniture to protect it"

  • facing: an ornamental coating to a building











removing veneer from furniture - Veneer: Living




Veneer: Living Deeply in a Surface Society


Veneer: Living Deeply in a Surface Society



Our lives are full of scars, quirks and insecurities we have learned to hide in favor of a more glamorous veneer we hope the world finds more acceptable. This is the modern tragedy. We have forgotten that like the stress-lines and fractures of antique wood, these imperfections in our lives are what make us beautiful.

Abundant living is more than a wall-post existence. Rich relationships are more than trends, status updates and group invitations. But neither are possible until we allow ourselves to be fully known, imperfections and all. Only then will we come to experience the life we are meant to live.

As authors Tim and Jason explain, the Creator's idea of humanity is quite different from the world's. It is also far more rewarding. This life begins when we dare strip away our veneers and enter a life of freedom, honesty and rare beauty.










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Battersea Power Station From Battersea Park Road




Battersea Power Station From Battersea Park Road





There's a very well placed brick wall at Thessaly Road to get a good shot of the building.
Grade II* listed.
Former electricity generating station. Built in 2 principal phases: 1929-35 and 1937-41, completed 1955. Built by the London Power Company to the design of Leonard Pearce, Engineer in Chief to the LPC, CS Allott & Son Engineers: the architects were J Theo Halliday and Sir Giles Gilbert Scott.

MATERIALS: Steel frame clad in brown Blockley bricks laid mainly in English bond; reinforced concrete roofs; that to the boiler houses currently (2005) missing; pre-cast concrete chimneys; metal-framed Crittall windows.

PLAN: approximately square on plan, comprising 2 independently-operating power stations: Station A, the western half and Station B, the eastern half. Laid out on a symmetrical plan, comprising a pair of long central boiler houses with large square pavilions - the washing towers - to each corner, surmounted by chimneys, flanked by a pair of lower, set back, turbine houses; these in turn are flanked by set back blocks containing switch houses and other ancillary spaces. Entrances to SW and SE. A vast underground coal store lies between the building and the river.

EXTERIOR: Symmetrical elevations. A low horizontal string-course of fluted concrete encircles the entire building denoting its base. Strongly articulated parapets to all elevations. Low pitched lanterns to roofs. The central, recessed, bays of the riverside (N) and S elevations have tall windows which light the boiler houses, and a fluted parapet which continues around the tower sides. The towers are the key to the composition. Their front and rear elevations are tripartite with a central projecting bay with vertical fluting, diminishing at the top. The upper parts are stepped back in a ziggurat formation as bases for the chimneys. The upper side elevations of the boiler houses are blind with lesenes demarcating the bays, and have set-back fluted parapets. The side elevations have small vertical windows and rows of transformer bays below. The S elevation of Station B is heavily fenestrated and does not match its counterpart. The chimneys are designed as fluted Doric columns and have 2 shaft rings at the top. Entrance to Station A has splendid bronze doors designed by Halliday depicting Energy personified; these are currently (2005) in storage.

INTERIOR: Internally, the principal interest lies in the functional plan form and the spaces outlined below. The central boiler houses are currently (2005) a roofless shell and await refurbishment.
Station A: Directors' entrance hall and staircase faced in grey Napoleon and Black Belgian marble and staircase; lift enclosure with steel-framed glazing and bronze doors. Marble Directors' tablet of 1933. The central boiler houses have no features of note. Machinery and floors removed from the boiler and turbine houses. Turbine House A has elaborate Art Deco finishes of biscuit-coloured faience with a blue mottled effect and darker blue string courses. The wall bays are defined by giant fluted pilasters with black faience bases; above these a steel crane gantry runner acts visually as the architrave, with faience relief panels above. The W side has 6 steel-framed oriel windows and 2 balconies at the upper levels to enable overlooking from the control room at the upper level of the adjacent switch house. Control Room A overlooks the turbine hall and has sumptuous Art Deco interior; the walls are lined with grey Ribbon Napoleon marble with fluting around the windows in Belgian Black marble. The ceiling is divided into 8 bays, each coffered and glazed with cellulose-coated decorative lights set in a steel frame, with original Holophane light fittings; and has a Vitruvian scroll frieze along the cornice soffit. It retains its original L-shaped control panel and walnut-veneer furniture.
Station B: The layout follows that of Station A with certain modifications. The turbine house is clad in blue-grey faience and follows the same bay rhythm as Turbine House A, but in a much more austere, stripped classical manner. Control Room B opens directly onto the turbine house; it is faience clad and retains its original stainless-steel control panels arranged in an arc. Ceiling supported by 2 pillars with octagonal faces on square, tapering bases. The upper control room, added in the 1950s, overlooks the turbine hall and retains control desks and panels. The switch-gear room also retains equipment.

SUBSIDIARY FEATURES: To the N on a jetty parallel to the river wall there are 2 cranes which were used to unload coal from collier boats. While of lesser significance, they were integral parts of the original complex and are now rare riverside features.

HISTORY: Battersea was designed to be constructed in 2 stages, planning permission being granted subject to the efficacy of the proposed 'gas washing' system. This linked the boilers to the towers, using water and alkaline sprays to remove sulphur from the gases. S











Chimneys: Battersea Power Station From Cringle Street




Chimneys: Battersea Power Station From Cringle Street





Grade II* listed.
Former electricity generating station. Built in 2 principal phases: 1929-35 and 1937-41, completed 1955. Built by the London Power Company to the design of Leonard Pearce, Engineer in Chief to the LPC, CS Allott & Son Engineers: the architects were J Theo Halliday and Sir Giles Gilbert Scott.

MATERIALS: Steel frame clad in brown Blockley bricks laid mainly in English bond; reinforced concrete roofs; that to the boiler houses currently (2005) missing; pre-cast concrete chimneys; metal-framed Crittall windows.

PLAN: approximately square on plan, comprising 2 independently-operating power stations: Station A, the western half and Station B, the eastern half. Laid out on a symmetrical plan, comprising a pair of long central boiler houses with large square pavilions - the washing towers - to each corner, surmounted by chimneys, flanked by a pair of lower, set back, turbine houses; these in turn are flanked by set back blocks containing switch houses and other ancillary spaces. Entrances to SW and SE. A vast underground coal store lies between the building and the river.

EXTERIOR: Symmetrical elevations. A low horizontal string-course of fluted concrete encircles the entire building denoting its base. Strongly articulated parapets to all elevations. Low pitched lanterns to roofs. The central, recessed, bays of the riverside (N) and S elevations have tall windows which light the boiler houses, and a fluted parapet which continues around the tower sides. The towers are the key to the composition. Their front and rear elevations are tripartite with a central projecting bay with vertical fluting, diminishing at the top. The upper parts are stepped back in a ziggurat formation as bases for the chimneys. The upper side elevations of the boiler houses are blind with lesenes demarcating the bays, and have set-back fluted parapets. The side elevations have small vertical windows and rows of transformer bays below. The S elevation of Station B is heavily fenestrated and does not match its counterpart. The chimneys are designed as fluted Doric columns and have 2 shaft rings at the top. Entrance to Station A has splendid bronze doors designed by Halliday depicting Energy personified; these are currently (2005) in storage.

INTERIOR: Internally, the principal interest lies in the functional plan form and the spaces outlined below. The central boiler houses are currently (2005) a roofless shell and await refurbishment.
Station A: Directors' entrance hall and staircase faced in grey Napoleon and Black Belgian marble and staircase; lift enclosure with steel-framed glazing and bronze doors. Marble Directors' tablet of 1933. The central boiler houses have no features of note. Machinery and floors removed from the boiler and turbine houses. Turbine House A has elaborate Art Deco finishes of biscuit-coloured faience with a blue mottled effect and darker blue string courses. The wall bays are defined by giant fluted pilasters with black faience bases; above these a steel crane gantry runner acts visually as the architrave, with faience relief panels above. The W side has 6 steel-framed oriel windows and 2 balconies at the upper levels to enable overlooking from the control room at the upper level of the adjacent switch house. Control Room A overlooks the turbine hall and has sumptuous Art Deco interior; the walls are lined with grey Ribbon Napoleon marble with fluting around the windows in Belgian Black marble. The ceiling is divided into 8 bays, each coffered and glazed with cellulose-coated decorative lights set in a steel frame, with original Holophane light fittings; and has a Vitruvian scroll frieze along the cornice soffit. It retains its original L-shaped control panel and walnut-veneer furniture.
Station B: The layout follows that of Station A with certain modifications. The turbine house is clad in blue-grey faience and follows the same bay rhythm as Turbine House A, but in a much more austere, stripped classical manner. Control Room B opens directly onto the turbine house; it is faience clad and retains its original stainless-steel control panels arranged in an arc. Ceiling supported by 2 pillars with octagonal faces on square, tapering bases. The upper control room, added in the 1950s, overlooks the turbine hall and retains control desks and panels. The switch-gear room also retains equipment.

SUBSIDIARY FEATURES: To the N on a jetty parallel to the river wall there are 2 cranes which were used to unload coal from collier boats. While of lesser significance, they were integral parts of the original complex and are now rare riverside features.

HISTORY: Battersea was designed to be constructed in 2 stages, planning permission being granted subject to the efficacy of the proposed 'gas washing' system. This linked the boilers to the towers, using water and alkaline sprays to remove sulphur from the gases. Station A was built 1929-35 and Station B 1937-41, the fourth (SE) chimney was added in 1955.









removing veneer from furniture








removing veneer from furniture




Woodworker's Guide to Veneering & Inlay: Techniques, Projects & Expert Advice for Fine Furniture






Woodworkers will learn how veneer is manufactured and how to choose glue, adhesives, and substrates; band-saw their own veneers; cut, match, and tape veneer panels; accomplish complete four-way matches; and other procedural skills in this expert guide. These techniques are demonstrated through a series of step-by-step exercises that culminate in four finished projects: a dining room table, a wall mirror with shelf, a marquetry picture, and a parquetry design. Complete with a troubleshooting section for repairs and problems and featuring contemporary methods and materials, such as hammer veneering with PVA glue and vacuum pressing of flat and curved panels, this reference is the most inclusive resource for working with veneer and inlay designs.










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